June’s Special Days

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What do Flag Day, Father’s Day and the first day of summer have in common? If you answered “they all occur in the month of June,” you’d be right.

National Flag Day is always on June 14.

Father’s Day is celebrated on the third Sunday in June. This year that was June 20.

The first day of summer in our hemisphere falls on the summer solstice. The date can be anywhere from June 20-June 23. For 2004, it was June 21.

National Flag Day has a long history and too many traditions to mention in this short space. There are also fourteen guidelines to be followed whenever the US flag is displayed, as well as numerous holidays when Old Glory should be flown.

And did you know that one of those holidays is Father’s Day?

The day to honor fathers happened because of a lady named Sonora Smart Dodd. She felt her father, who became both mom and dad to her and her five siblings after her mother died, should be honored for the wonderful job he did. The first Father’s Day celebration was in June 1910. In 1972, thanks to President Richard Nixon, Father’s Day became an official holiday and the flag could be flown to celebrate the occasion. Another special event in the rose and pearl month is first day of summer. On that date our Northern Hemisphere hosts over fourteen hours of daylight.

During ancient times, the summer solstice signaled the start of joyous festivals and celebrations. Rites to the gods of fertility and a bountiful harvest were especially popular. Scholars believe many of the stone structures found around the world, including Stonehenge, are linked to the solstice.

Here in Carpenter Country, our rituals are more modern. On the three June holidays that occurred so close together, we hoisted the flag, wished Dad a Happy Father’s Day–and helped him celebrate the first day of summer with a cookout.

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We write. Visit us in Carpenter Country, a magical place that, like our stories, is unreal but not untrue.

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